Little Sisters of Poor Win Big at Supreme Court, but Fight Isn’t Over

Why are some in the government so determined to force a group of Catholic nuns to violate their beliefs? That’s a question we all should be asking as we celebrate Wednesday’s Supreme Court victory for the Little Sisters. Regrettably, Wednesday’s victory is unlikely to be the end of the government harassment of the nuns. The Little … Continue reading Little Sisters of Poor Win Big at Supreme Court, but Fight Isn’t Over

“Drug Czar” Says Overdose Deaths Were Already Rising Before Pandemic and Now Are Spiking—The Ultimate Blame Belongs to Prohibition

White House “drug czar” Jim Carroll told Politico earlier this week that an Office of National Drug Control Policy analysis finds an 11.4 percent year‐​over‐​year increase in opioid‐​related overdose deaths during the first four months of 2020. Kentucky has seen a 25 percent increase in overdose deaths during the first four months of this year, and West Virginia saw … Continue reading “Drug Czar” Says Overdose Deaths Were Already Rising Before Pandemic and Now Are Spiking—The Ultimate Blame Belongs to Prohibition

Supreme Court Hands Huge Victory to Families on School Choice

In a 5-4 decision, the Supreme Court held that families have a right to seek the best educational opportunities for their children, by preventing states from blocking the participation of religiously affiliated schools in state school choice programs. In Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue, the court ruled that the application of a “no-aid” provision in … Continue reading Supreme Court Hands Huge Victory to Families on School Choice

Freedom of Religion Narrowly Upheld in Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue

On June 30 the Supreme Court reaffirmed what most Americans no doubt take for granted, that the Constitution prohibits religious discrimination. The 5-4 divide among the justices in Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue, however, shows that religious freedom is not fully secure in America. Different state and local governments have developed “school choice” programs … Continue reading Freedom of Religion Narrowly Upheld in Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue

Supreme Court Rules Montana Can’t Exclude Religious Schools From Scholarship Program in Landmark Win for Education Choice

In an effort to secure the best education possible for their children, three mothers launched a court case five years ago that may now dramatically expand education options for many more families across the country. Today, the US Supreme Court struck down as unconstitutional a Montana statute that prohibited tax-credit scholarship funds from being used … Continue reading Supreme Court Rules Montana Can’t Exclude Religious Schools From Scholarship Program in Landmark Win for Education Choice

Republican Senator Introduces Bill to Roll Back Police Liability Shield

Some Republicans have called repealing or rolling back “qualified immunity,” the legal doctrine that shields police officers from liability, a “poison pill” that can’t be included in any criminal justice reform package. But other leaders in Congress disagree—and Sen. Mike Braun is the latest to back qualified immunity reform. The Indiana Republican just introduced the … Continue reading Republican Senator Introduces Bill to Roll Back Police Liability Shield

Constitutionally, Religious Gatherings Must Enjoy the Same Rights As Protest Gatherings

Ten days can be a long time in constitutional law. On May 29 a closely divided U.S. Supreme Court, with Chief Justice John Roberts joining the four more liberal Justices, refused to order California to lift its restrictions, meant to curb transmission of the novel coronavirus, on church services that have more than 100 attendees or fill more than … Continue reading Constitutionally, Religious Gatherings Must Enjoy the Same Rights As Protest Gatherings

You Ought to Be Able to Challenge Your Placement on the No‐​Fly List

Placement on the FBI’s Terrorist Screening Database (the “Watchlist”) is never a good thing. For 23 Muslim‐​American litigants, among thousands of others listed, it means reduced employment opportunities, potential arrest and detention, and, most notoriously, severe limitations on their freedom to travel by air. The government insists it doesn’t need court approval before placing someone on … Continue reading You Ought to Be Able to Challenge Your Placement on the No‐​Fly List

How the Drug War Broke Policing

In the famous Norman Rockwell painting “Runaway,” seen on the cover of the Saturday Evening Post in 1958, a kindly police officer and a pubescent boy sit at a lunch counter, the boy clearly having packed some belongings in a kerchief and run away. It’s a wholesome encounter and one wholly at odds with our modern image of police. That’s because it’s … Continue reading How the Drug War Broke Policing

Americans Don’t Want to #Defund Police, Instead They Agree on Reform

Connor Friedersdor writes in the Atlantic that police reform is popular, while rioting is not. He’s right. While only 16% of Americans favor cutting funding for police departments, the Cato Criminal Justice National Survey found that Americans across racial and political backgrounds support a variety of policy changes that reformers say would help mend fences between police and the communities they serve. Read the … Continue reading Americans Don’t Want to #Defund Police, Instead They Agree on Reform